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Episode No.
Date
Length
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 23

Big investors are buying up local veterinary practices (and pretty much everything else). What does this mean for scruffy little Max* — and for the U.S. economy? (Part 1 of 2.)

*The most popular dog name in the U.S. in 2022.

2/2/23
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 22

We tend to look down on artists who can’t match their breakthrough success. Should we be celebrating them instead?

1/26/23
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 21

Economists and politicians have turned Adam Smith into a mascot for free-market ideology. Some on the left say the right has badly misread him. Prepare for a very Smithy tug of war. (Part 3 of “In Search of the Real Adam Smith.”)

1/19/23
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 20

Economists and politicians have turned Adam Smith into a mascot for free-market ideology. Some on the left say the right has badly misread him. Prepare for a very Smithy tug of war. (Part 2 of “In Search of the Real Adam Smith.”)

1/12/23
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 19

How did an affable 18th-century “moral philosopher” become the patron saint of cutthroat capitalism? Does “the invisible hand” mean what everyone thinks it does? We travel to Adam Smith’s hometown in Scotland to uncover the man behind the myth. (Part 1 of a series.)

1/5/23
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 18

Arthur Brooks is an economist who for 10 years ran the American Enterprise Institute, one of the most influential conservative think tanks in the world. He has come to believe there is only one weapon that can defeat our extreme political polarization: love. Is Brooks a fool for thinking this — and are you perhaps his kind of fool?

12/29/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 17

The public has almost no chance to buy good tickets to the best events. Ticket brokers, meanwhile, make huge profits on the secondary markets. Here’s the story of how this market got so dysfunctional, how it can be fixed – and why it probably won’t be.

12/22/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 16

Evidence from Nazi Germany and 1940s America (and pretty much everywhere else) shows that discrimination is incredibly costly — to the victims, of course, but also the perpetrators. One modern solution is to invoke a diversity mandate. But new research shows that’s not necessarily the answer.

12/15/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 15

Did Michael Lewis just get lucky with “Moneyball”? No — but he does have a knack for stumbling into the perfect moment, including the recent FTX debacle.

12/8/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 14

Is Google getting worse? It used to feel like magic. Now it can feel like a set of cheap tricks. Is the problem with Google — or with us?

12/1/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 13

The banana, once a luxury good, rose to become America’s favorite fruit. Now a deadly fungus threatens to wipe it out. Can it be saved?

11/24/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 12

It’s fun to obsess over pop stars and racecar drivers — but is fandom making our politics even more toxic?

11/17/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 11

The last two years have radically changed the way we work — producing winners, losers, and a lot of surprises.

11/10/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 10

Has globalization failed? It was supposed to boost prosperity and democracy at the same time. What really happened? According to the legal scholar Anthea Roberts, it depends which story you believe.

11/3/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 9

Are personal finance gurus giving you bad advice? One Yale economist certainly thinks so. But even if he’s right, are economists any better?

10/27/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 8

New research finds that bosses who went to business school pay their workers less. So what are M.B.A. programs teaching — and should they stop?

10/20/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 7

The pandemic provided city dwellers with a break from the din of the modern world. Now the noise is coming back. What does that mean for our productivity, health, and basic sanity?

10/13/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 6

Liberals endorse harm reduction when it comes to the opioid epidemic. Are they ready to take the same approach to climate change?

10/6/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 5

The pandemic moved a lot of religious activity onto the internet. With faith-based apps, Silicon Valley is turning virtual prayers into earthly rewards. Does this mean sharing user data? Dear God, let’s hope not …

9/29/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 4

As the Biden administration rushes to address climate change, Stephen Dubner looks at another, hidden cost of air pollution — one that’s affecting how we think.

9/22/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 3

The controversial Harvard economist Roland Fryer, recently back from a suspension, “broke a lot of glass early in my career,” he says. His research on school incentives and police brutality won him acclaim — but also enemies. Now he’s taking a hard look at corporate diversity programs. The common thread in his work? “I refuse to not tell the truth.”

9/15/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 2

Should public transit be free? It boosts economic opportunity and social mobility. It’s good for the environment. So why do we charge people to use it? The short answer: it’s complicated.

9/8/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 12, Episode 1

Is art really meant to be an “asset class”? Will the digital revolution finally democratize a market that just keeps getting more elitist? And what will happen to the last painting Alice Neel ever made? (Part 3 of “The Hidden Side of the Art Market.”)

9/1/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 52

The more successful an artist is, the more likely their work will later be resold at auction for a huge markup — and they receive nothing. Should that change? Also: why doesn’t contemporary art impact society the way music and film do? (Part 2 of “The Hidden Side of the Art Market.”)

8/25/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 51

The art market is so opaque and illiquid that it barely functions like a market at all. A  handful of big names get all the headlines (and most of the dollars). Beneath the surface is a tangled web of dealers, curators, auction houses, speculators — and, of course, artists. In the first episode of a three-part series, we meet the key players and learn how an obscure, long-dead American painter suddenly became a superstar. (Part 1 of “The Hidden Side of the Art Market.”)

8/18/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 50

Does philosophy still matter? It used to be at the center of our conversations about politics and society. Scott Hershovitz (author of Nasty, Brutish, and Short) argues that philosophy still has a lot to say about work, justice, and parenthood. Our latest installment of the Freakonomics Radio Book Club.

8/11/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 49

Why did you marry that person? Sure, you were “in love.” But economists — using evidence from Bridgerton to Tinder — point to what’s called “assortative mating.” And it has some unpleasant consequences for society.

8/4/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 48

In one of the earliest Freakonomics Radio episodes, we asked a bunch of economists with young kids how they approached child-rearing. Now the kids are old enough to talk — and they have a lot to say. We hear about nature vs. nurture, capitalism vs. Marxism, and why you don’t tell your friends that your father is an economist.

7/28/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 47

Boosters say blockchain technology will usher in a brave new era of decentralization. Are they right — and would it be a dream or a nightmare? (Part 3 of “What Can Blockchain Do for You?“)

7/21/22
50:30
No. 0

Season 11, Episode 46

Are N.F.T.s all scams? Some of them are. With others, it’s more complicated (and more promising). We try to get past the Bored Apes and the ripoffs to see if we can find art on the blockchain. (Part 2 of “What Can Blockchain Do for You?“)

7/14/22
50:30
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